7 Reasons Why Tile Rocks

There is a reason—several, actually—why tile has been around since Mesopotamian times. Namely, its resilience. As markets and technology continue to grow, new and innovative features give tile even greater appeal. In all its forms (glass, metal, porcelain, ceramic and more) tile continues to be a popular potential option for every and any room. Here are seven reasons why tile continues to delight us:

 

1. Expressive

Tile allows for expression. Contrary to what you might believe, there are many design options that go beyond squares, beyond flooring and beyond the classic ceramic and porcelain materials.

In fact, tile is highly customizable. Sizes range from bite-sized mosaic pieces to oversized slabs. Bold, geometric statements are growing in popularity although traditional grid formats still abound. Rapidly evolving technology means that even imitation varieties are becoming more and more realistic.

Perhaps most exciting is the broad variety of materials available to us: hand-painted ceramic, timeless marble, stain resistant porcelain, crystallized travertine, earthen pebbles, wood-imitation ceramic or rustic slate shot through with a sparkle of quartz, to name just a few.

Why tile? Between size, design and color, options are limitless!

 

2. Versatile

Placement offers yet another mode of expression. Tile is at once functional and decorative. Thus why tile can be used all over the house. Accent walls create a focal point in a room and can be used to guide the eye. Backsplashes lend a touch of character to your kitchen, as well as protection from spills and splatters. More unconventionally, tile can be incorporated into tabletops, statement mirrors or even fire surrounds. The broad variety of tile surfaces make it a surface possibility in any household room.

 

3. Affordable

Tile is, for the most part, affordable. This can vary greatly depending on the exact kind of material, but tile is generally less expensive than hardwood. Varieties of carpet may be cheaper, but it requires more maintenance over time than tile (see number 7 below). In a study conducted by the Tile Council of North America, it was determined that ceramic tiles are the most economical of all flooring options.

Tile is also quick and simple to install. Peel-and-stick varieties can be done by homeowners, shaving installation costs down to a whopping 0$. The fact that each tile is independent from the next—except for a thin, adjoining line of grout—means that damaged tiles can be easily replaced. Rather than having to reinstall an entire surface, you only need to fix a section, meaning tile costs less to repair than hardwood or carpet.

 

4. Profitable

Tile can also increase the resale value of a home if it’s incorporated in a functional and attractive way. Kitchen backsplashes and other clever accents convey both beauty and quality, another reason why tile is a good choice for those wanting a touch of self-expression. As a flooring material, tile is not only an aesthetic choice, but also the functional choice because of its cleanability. Having high-quality tile in your kitchen and bathroom can significantly affect the resale value of a home, so it’s worth investing in something well-crafted.

 

5. Green

Whereas carpet can contribute to indoor air pollution by holding onto allergens and soil, tile minimizes indoor air pollution. This is because it doesn’t emit gasses like carpet, wood or laminate might. The latter two require coats of glue and finish before installation. Tile is fired in high-temperatures, killing all volatile organic compounds while in the kiln. This means no emissions!

Tile is also hypoallergenic. Its smooth surface offers fewer attachment sites so that microbes, mites and mold are all less likely to make homes in your home. This makes tile the allergy-friendly choice and an easy clean. Coupled with its minimal production waste and long life span, tile is a healthy choice for you and the planet.

 

6. Durable

Entire pieces of tile remain intact from the Mesopotamian era. Clearly, tile lasts. Waterproof, spill proof and scratch resistant, tile is nothing if not resilient. When it comes to porcelain, the PEI Rating system can tell you exactly how resilient the glaze of a porcelain tile is. It ranks tile on a scale from 1 to 5, indicating the strength of a tile and therefore optimal locations. A tile with a level 1 rating is the most fragile, and should never be used underfoot. These kinds of tiles are used in areas with no foot traffic such as on walls. On the other end of the spectrum is a tile ranked PEI-5, and offer the kind of durability needed in counters and heavy commercial applications—markets, malls, airports and so forth. Wherever you’re installing tile, there’s a variety perfectly suited to potential traffic and wear.

 

7. Cooling (or heating)

If you have a pup in the house, you may have noticed he or she sprawls on the tile when it’s hot. This is because tile surfaces are generally cooler. Or, they feel cooler. If a carpet and tile surface are both the same temperature (say 75 degrees Farenheit) the tile will still feel cooler. This is because of thermoconductivity. Tile conducts heat away more quickly from your body than carpet. We don’t feel temperature. What we are actually feeling is how quickly heat conducts away from or toward our bodies.

Simply put, this is why tile keeps your home feeling cool. Ideal for summertime. Worried about winter? Tile also pairs well with a floor heating system, making it an excellent choice in any season.

 

(Bonus) Easily Maintained

One of tile’s best attributes is its cleanability. The process is simple and straightforward. It usually only involves a damp cloth and perhaps a cleaner.

However, even tile needs touch-ups now and then. Especially because grout is so susceptible to stains and bacteria-retention (see our article here). Zerorez offers expert tile and grout cleaning. With a 1200 psi pressure wash and high suction vacuum, we leave tile clean and beautiful. For more information, please visit us at zerorezla.com or give us a ring at 818-881-5744.

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